Writing is NOT a Hobby?

It never ceases to amaze me how easy it is for me to abandon my writing to do something else — surf the social media sites, work on a bathroom remodel, write a presentation for an upcoming class, watch the news.  I have a wonderful new regimen for writing and it was working great, until I interrupted it with finishing my presentation for the class I am teaching in the fall.  Granted, the presentation needed to be finished, but during MY WRITING TIME set aside specifically for ME???????

I think I get so caught up in necessities and expectations that I sacrifice the one thing that means the most to me — my writing time.  So how is it that I can so easily give up my writing time to use for other purposes.  Well, if I knew that, I could stop it (couldn’t I?).  It makes me wonder whether writing is all that important to me after all.  How can I so easily sacrifice it to the banality of the day-to-day.

The reality of my writing life is that maybe, just maybe, I still don’t look at it as a career.  So often we are raised to believe that any artistic expression is a hobby, not a career.  As a hobby, it becomes secondary to the responsibilities of the day-to-day routine.  So I think I still have that in my mind, at the heart of the matter.  My writing, while I love it, is still a hobby to me and not a career.  So, how do I change that notion?  How do I reprogram my belief system to accommodate writing as a my career?  After all, I was a professional technical writer for most of my adult life.  Why is writing a novel any different? Hmmm.  I will have to ponder on that some.

 

-AH

Also posted on my other site at http://www.andreahunter313.wordpress.com.

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Subplot Frustrations

I’ve been working on my novel this week. Yay!!  It feels really great to be writing and getting so much done.  However, it can be very frustrating writing 2 or 3 plot lines that must somehow coincide and be resolved at the end of the story.  This frustration likely stems from me fighting with myself.  But it is still very real.

I start writing about the main characters and forget that I have a couple of subplots going that are important to the story. Then I feel like I am back-tracking when I focus on writing the subplots. I know they are necessary to further the story and create a more rich novel. But I feel like I will never move forward. This feeling is ridiculous, of course, because each word written furthers the storyline. Nevertheless, I feel that way.

So, I thought about writing each plot line separately, then weaving them together. Not wanting to spend too much time on it if it is a crazy idea, I still thought it might be worth a try. Well, let me tell you, as soon as I started that tack, I knew I shouldn’t. There’s way too much to remember and trying to weave them together after the fact would be even more frustrating. These plot lines happen concurrently, so writing them separately is foolish.

I will just have to realize that, as frustrating as it might be, I am not losing ground when I return to a chapter or scene and add in subplot storyline. Either that, or I will have to learn to write the plotlines concurrently. Truth is, this experience of writing my first novel is a major learning experience. And, overall, I am having so much fun doing it.

-AH

Initially published on my concurrent blog site at andreahunter313.wordpress.com